Wild Rumpus Sports
 

What My Teammates Have Taught Me

Upon returning from our last U.S. Ski Team camp of the year in Park City, Utah back to Dartmouth to finish up fall term, I have been thinking a lot about how I am extremely fortunate to be surrounded by incredible teammates wherever I go. Each team and individual teammate has taught me something different, and I know I wouldn’t be nearly as fast or have nearly as much fun without them!

For starters, I am very appreciative that each of my teams support me to pursue both my skiing and academic pursuits.  The past few years I have been hopping between the Dartmouth, SMS T2, and the U.S. Ski Team and the amount I spend with each team has changed every year. My teammates on all three teams have been extremely supportive and understanding as I phase in and out (for example leaving Dartmouth for a U.S. Ski Team camp and then coming back to Dartmouth).

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Really excited to be back with the Women’s U.S. Ski Team in Park City last week!

I have come to realize that I have learned an endless amount from my teammates and the list could go on forever, but here are some of the most important things I have learned (no particular order).

  1. Most important, always remember to have FUN!

Training with teammates is the best way to have fun, hands down! If you are not having fun, something needs to change.

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YAY for snow!
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Jessie introducing a new technique….?
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Carving some turns with Andy in New Zealand.
  1. You are stronger as a team, working together is the best way to get faster.

I have learned this and experienced this across all teams I have been on. When everyone gets together to train, they push each other, support each other, challenge each other, and raise everyone to the next level.

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Pushing each other in races.
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Learning how to lunge with the help of coaches, Kelsey (giving feedback from watching), and Ida! What a fun workout!
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Hannah and I went on 3 week trip alone in Germany, training and racing together! I couldn’t have done it without her.
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Practicing a tricky sprint corner…and learning what not to do.
  1. Learn by following.

Everyone skis a little differently, you can learn a lot by skiing behind someone else!

 

  1. Set BIG goals, work hard and believe in them…and anything is possible.
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Jessie’s and Kikkan’s Gold Medal has truly inspired me and taught me that anything is possible if you set your mind to it!
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2 years prior we talked about how crazy it would be to medal at World Juniors…and it happened.
  1. Teammates are there to support you and to be supported.

Whether it’s a needed hug, a sunset walk, a pillow talk, or a pump up dance party, your teammates are there for you and you should be there for them. Your celebrate the highs together and ride the lows together.

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Sunset walks ❤
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Teammates make great pillows!
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Sometimes you need a hug…and someone to hold you up when your are too tired to stand.
  1. You can use your position to have an impact beyond your racing career.

There are so many opportunities to inspire and create change. For example…
– Community outreach
– Inspiring the next generation of skiers (and non skiers)
– Having a voice about pressing issues (POW for example)
– Helping kids have access to the outdoors
– Growing confidence in young girls to pursue their passions
– And many more!

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This summer I became a Little Bellas ambassador and it has been so fun!
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Jessie advocating for Protect Our Winters (POW).
  1. Its okay to be your goofy self…actually its encouraged to be super goofy!
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Getting goofy with some fun Dartmouth traditions this fall.
  1. Skiers love being active in the outdoors, which makes for some pretty awesome adventure buddies.

Skiers share their love for snow, the mountains, and being active outdoors. You will never be short on buddies to go on long adventures with.

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Crust cruising in New Zealand!
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Summit photo.
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Mountain biking with Sophie!
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Adventuring in mountains.

So THANK YOU to all of my teammates, I am forever grateful to have you as my teammates and continue to learn new things every day 🙂

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SMS T2 Team
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Dartmouth Women’s Team
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U.S. Ski Team.

Walking The Fine Line

Since high school, I have been bouncing back and forth between doing a full term at Dartmouth while training, and solely focusing on skiing. These two lifestyles fall on opposite side of the spectrum—when I am in school I am wishing I had more free time and while when I am just skiing, I have too much free time to fill. My frustrating season last year didn’t discourage me, it actually did the exact opposite—it made me want to be “all in” this year and set really big goals. Ironically, I came to conclusion that being “all in” for me meant not just focusing on skiing, but rather, it meant the opposite—that I would go to school and train with the Dartmouth team while taking a full course load in the spring, summer, and fall (a full year of school). Focused and “all in” at training camp (Pat). Growing up,…

Finishing Strong

If your parents were anything like mine, then you were probably tossed into the deep end and had to learn how to swim from there. You could say that is what it felt like to jump on the World Cup circuit for the first time, spend 4 straight months in Europe (which is my longest streak yet), and travel across 10 different countries. I am going to admit, the first few weekends on the World Cup were really tough. I had some expectations and goals based off the end of last season, but I fell short of what I had hoped for—not just in results—but in my general form as well (unfortunately in part due to being injured the 5 months leading up to the season). Fortunately, just like your parents are there to help you learn how to swim, I was surrounded by teammates, coaches, family, and friends, who…

Blank Slate

Once again, my bags have been packed and unpacked too many times to count since my last post. After Zwiesel, I headed to Obsertdorf for a German Cup with Hannah, which was our last stop on our Germany tour. After taking 3 full off days in hopes of kicking my illness for good (but really this time), I had my head up and eyes looking forward. I was ready to put my illnesses behind me and just go out and race hard. The sprint day was shock to the system and gave my body the wake up call it needed to get back in gear and fired up again. I put my “Darth Vader mask” on at the start of the 10k skate mass start, told myself it is a new day and put my sensations from the sprint behind me, and was ready to charge (I mostly wore it…

Turning Things Around

*Sorry for the long hiatus mid season, my computer was broken all of January, and it is hard to get a new one when you are in Europe all winter. I am going to be brutally honest and say that the past 7 weeks have been really hard for me. I usually try to see the positive side of things and can deal with setbacks pretty well, but that gets really tiring after a while. 5 days ago I was ready to book a ticket home—that is when things turned around (once again)… Rewind 7 weeks ago. I kicked off the New Year by coming down with a bad cold, leaving me lying in bed for 7 days and not even training for 10 days. I was bummed to miss some OPA Cup races, but kept my mind focused on resting a lot so I would be ready for my…

Little Fish, Big Pond

A little fish in a big pond—that is what it felt like when I jumped into Period 1 of the World Cup, which arguably are some of the most competitive World Cups all year. They don’t call us youngsters the “little gupps” for nothing! I took the big leap to the next level and right … More Little Fish, Big Pond

Little Fish, Big Pond

A little fish in a big pond—that is what it felt like when I jumped into Period 1 of the World Cup, which arguably are some of the most competitive World Cups all year. They don’t call us youngsters the “little gupps” for nothing! I took the big leap to the next level and right off the bat, I was blown away by how fast the skiers on the World Cup are. I immediately had expectations and set result goals even though I was told these races were for gaining experience and learning. It wasn’t until someone reminded me that my teammates who have been crushing it this season, were in the same place as I am now a few years ago. Normally, people don’t jump in and start winning right away, it takes racing and experience over time to gradually work your way to the top. So what was…

Personal Wins

*Sorry for the long break in between blogs, it has been a busy fall…but that is no real excuse. This is a blog I have wanted to post for a while, and now more than ever, is it a good reminder to myself. Winning isn’t necessarily about crossing the line first. You can cross the … More Personal Wins

Personal Wins

*Sorry for the long break in between blogs, it has been a busy fall…but that is no real excuse. This is a blog I have wanted to post for a while, and now more than ever, is it a good reminder to myself. Winning isn’t necessarily about crossing the line first. You can cross the line in first, yet be very disappointed in your race…or you can finish last and feel like you won the race (yes, this happens). The more I got my butt handed to me in intervals and time trials this summer, the more my confidence could fade. Year after year I catch myself getting caught up in training results and I have to remind myself that in training, it is all about the personal wins. This reminder came to me during the last U.S. Ski Team training camp in Park City, Utah. We were doing a…

Adventures From New Zealand

I just got back from my 3-week training camp down in New Zealand and it was awesome! This was the longest training camp I have ever been to and I loved it! As a cross-country skier from the east, my time spent skiing on snow begins late November and stretches to the end of March, and that is only if it is a good snow year. This means I only get to spend 4 months on snow (which is also the race season) and the remaining 8 months of the year I do dry land training to prepare myself for the short season. Even though I was limited by how much I could ski with two poles, the opportunity to ski on snow for 3 straight weeks in the summer (their winter) with my team was incredible. Fresh snow on the last day! Sunshine and perfect klister conditions, what more…